Co-ops and politics

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Now that the elections are over, let me extend my congratulations to the winners. I know I am not the only one surprised with some of the result yielding unexpected winners who themselves were equally astonished. Anyway, this is the time to prove your worth. Its time to back up your promises you made during the campaign with solid and tangible actions. A great leader is always a man (or a woman) of his words.  Service was your primordial intention when you decided to run for public office in the first place, I assume.  So be it. Let not the people serve you. Serve the people instead.

To those who did not make it, to those who almost made it with just a few votes short and those having great expectations of winning but the results did not cooperate, it could be a heartbreaking experience. I do not exactly know the feeling but if we are to believe the motivational writers and speakers, this is not a loss. It is just a setback, a learning experience. Three years is not a long time to wait for another shot at it. In fact, I heard people inside coffee shops say, it will only take 3 nights of sleep. After all, everything happens for a reason, sages would say. Whatever those reasons are, it would be best to discover them and use them to become better, not only as a politician but as a person.

Meanwhile, many people are saying co-ops are apolitical. An apolitical is someone who has no interest in politics. To this day however, I have not seen a co-op that is not interested in politics. There is politics even inside the co-op especially when they elect their officers. The truth is, co-ops scrutinize the advocacy of political candidates to find out his view on co-ops. Although it is not an absolute consideration, pro-coop politicians are the preferred ones when the co-op people go to the polling places.  Conversing with some co-op leaders before the elections, I came to know that they will vote for Duterte just because he mentioned co-ops during the presidential debates. (This is just an example to illustrate my point.)

Co-ops may not be apolitical but they are prohibited to engage in partisan politics or “partisanism” like when there is an aggressive and passionate display of favoritism towards a certain party and often unwilling to compromise with another party. Partisan politics could exist inside co-ops but the compromise is to respect individual preferences and choices. This means a co-op supports whoever wins regardless of political affiliations and I am referring to both the leaders in government and leaders in the co-op.

With the accreditation by COMELEC of co-op party-lists to participate in political exercises, I guess co-ops can now engage in partisan politics.

 

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